The impossible is the least that one can demand.

— James Baldwin

Below is the preface to my most recent work, An Anarchist’s Manifesto. I hope you will consider reading the book.

Anarchism is commonly viewed as an outdated and wholly impractical idea. Worse, it has an accursed reputation for advocating chaos, violence, and destruction. The aim of An Anarchist’s Manifesto is to convince readers of the exact opposite: that anarchism is the most adaptive, humane, intelligent, singly inclusive proposal that we, as social animals, have ever envisioned.

Are You Already An Anarchist?

When driving in traffic, do you take care to avoid accidents? What…


Secular Buddhism, “like all ‘isms’…is at best a parody, at worst a constriction.”(Nick Land*)

I am working on a detailed critique of the Secular Buddhist movement in the West. The critique employs speculative non-buddhist theory. What it shows is that Secular Buddhism is beholden to the identical transcendental norm as the most flagrantly religious and conservatively orthodox forms of Buddhism.

In the meantime, I read Stephen Batchelor’s “A Secular Buddhist.” This short piece is being distributed in advance of a public discussion between Batchelor and Don Cupitt, a self-described “secular Christian,” at London Insight Meditation. (Link below.)

Here, I would…


Heuristic of Non-Buddhism

19 Heuristic. Speculative non-buddhism aims to stall the swirl of x-buddhist decision so that, dust settled, we may gain a fresh perspective on x-buddhist thought and practice. In light of the machinations of buddhistic decision, this perspective must necessarily be neither from within nor from outside of x-buddhism itself. The investigator must remain unbeholden to x-buddhism’s structural schemes, rhetorical tropes, and decisional strategies. To these ends, speculative non-buddhism offers specific methodological operations, or a heuristic. The terms of the heuristic may be viewed as exploratory postulates. As such, the investigator may choose to perform a critical-constructive dialogue with a given…


§ 16.2 of “Speculative Non-Buddhism: X-buddhist Hallucination and Decimation,” in Cruel Theory|Sublime Practice.

Michel Pêcheux and disidentification. Pêcheux, a student of Althusser’s, was not alone in finding that his teacher did not offer a clear enough account of how the conditions for a critical practice as a “science” of ideology arose for the (always, thus already, subjugated) individual. For many, it seemed that Althusser’s emphasis on the institutional nature of subject formation via ideological state apparatuses allowed too little room for vigorous rejection of the subject-forming hail.

As many commentators have pointed out, one of the most perplexing aspects of…


Randy Rosenthal and Glenn Wallis talk about A Critique of Western Buddhism

Introduction by Randy Rosenthal: Glenn Wallis’s book A Critique of Western Buddhism: Ruins of the Buddhist Real is blistering. So hot I often had to stop reading to let out a “Whew!” For forty-plus years, Wallis has been “actively surveying the Buddhist landscape,” as he writes in his Preface; with a Ph.D in Buddhist Studies from Harvard, he’s a scholar and translator of Pali, Sanskrit, and Tibetan texts; yet he’s also studied with achans in tropical forests of Thailand, rinpoches in the Himalaya, and roshis in Japan; and…


The following article was published as a new introduction to The Prophet with The Forerunner and The Madman by Kahlil Gibran (Warbler Classics, 2019).

__________________

Literature “must be the axe to crack open the frozen sea inside us,” wrote Franz Kafka in 1904, not quite two decades before Kahlil Gibran published The Prophet while living in New York City. By that time Gibran had spent the greater part of twenty-eight years in the United States, after arriving first in Boston at the age of twelve as a penniless immigrant from his native Lebanon (then part of Syria) in 1895. He…


Explication is the annihilation of one mind by another…whoever teaches without emancipating, stultifies. — Jacques Rancière, The Ignorant Schoolmaster

Professors in the humanities view themselves as fostering crucial human capacities. These capacities, deemed necessary not merely for our flourishing, but for our very survival as a species, include: sound reasoning, critical thinking, engaged dialogue, creativity and innovation, analytical acumen, broad cultural knowledge, and empathic understanding of diverse worldviews. This statement from the Stanford University Humanities Center on ”Why the Humanities Matter” is indicative of the general spirit:

Today, humanistic knowledge continues to provide the ideal foundation for exploring and understanding…


Explication is the annihilation of one mind by another…whoever teaches without emancipating, stultifies. — Jacques Rancière, The Ignorant Schoolmaster

https://inciteseminars.com

Professors in the humanities view themselves as fostering crucial human capacities. These capacities, deemed necessary not merely for our flourishing, but for our very survival as a species, include: sound reasoning, critical thinking, engaged dialogue, creativity and innovation, analytical acumen, broad cultural knowledge, and empathic understanding of diverse worldviews. This statement from the Stanford University Humanities Center on ”Why the Humanities Matter” is indicative of the general spirit:

Today, humanistic knowledge continues to provide the ideal foundation for exploring and understanding…


A ruin is a curious thing. Imagine the Acropolis or Borobudur, Ephesus or the Great Wall of China. Magnificent structures erected on the foundation of a society’s most advanced technologies and its most sophisticated sciences. Constructed from raw materials — wood, metals, stone, lime mortar, marble, glass, turf and soil — quarried, excavated, transported, and formed by the labor — the debilitating, depleting sweat and toil — of flesh and blood men, women, and children. But a ruin is more than the material out of which it is fashioned. It in infused with the longing of a people. Longing for…

Glenn Wallis

Writing mostly about Buddhism, non-buddhism, radical education theory, and anarchism. Visit my personal website for more: www.glennwallis.com

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